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Spring 2015 Schedule

All Humanities Institute events are free and open to the public and refreshments are always served!


Parking on USF Tampa Campus

Parking can be difficult on campus. Here are a few tips to make coming to events easier! Please refer to the following links for more information.

Parking and Transportation Permits

All venues are convenient to visitor parking areas with automated Pay-by-Space machines. Download the Visitor Parking Map to identify the buildings and associated parking lots listed below.

  • Patel Center for Global Solutions (CGS) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 23B
  • Grace Allen Room (Library) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 29B and the Collins Blvd. Parking Garage
  • C.W. Bill Young Hall (CWY) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 21 or Lot 6
  • Alumni Center (ALC) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 23B and Visitor Parking in Lot 23T
  • Marshall Student Center (MSC) - Pay-by-Space in Lots 3B, 3C, and the Crescent Hill Parking Garage
  • TECO Room (College of Education/EDU) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 29B and the Collins Blvd. Parking Garage


Wednesday, Jan. 14
Grace Allen Room (Library, 4th Floor)
3:00pm refreshments, 3:30pm lecture

Homegrown Humanities: Boxcar Politics: The Hobo in U.S. Culture and Literature, with John Lennon

Lennon’s newest book explores the cultural history of the hobo in the United States. Once categorized as a member of a homeless army who ought to be jailed or killed, the hobo has evolved into a safe, grandfatherly exemplar of Americana. Lennon places portrayals of hobos in the works of Jack London, Jim Tully, John Dos Passos, and Jack Kerouac alongside the lived reality of people hopping trains. He investigates how these marginalized individuals exerted collective political voices through subcultural practices.


Tuesday, Jan. 20
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

The Eversion of Cyberspace and the Emergence of the Digital Humanities, with Steven Jones

While “digital humanities” has become something of a buzz-word of late, there are many versions of what it means, and how it affects research, teaching and learning. This January, we’re delighted to welcome a pioneer in digital humanities, Steven Jones, who will address the implications of profound technological changes for the humanities.
 

 


Tuesday, Jan. 27
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Art and Ethnography in the Post-Western Museum with James Clifford

James Clifford will be the first Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence of Spring 2015. He is Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and Emeritus Professor in the History of Consciousness Department, University of California, Santa Cruz and will give a public lecture exploring the shifting institutional relations between art and ethnography, drawing on examples from museological innovations in Vancouver, Berlin, and Paris. He asks: “what is gained and lost in the increasing pressure to represent “global arts and cultures?” What prospects for serious cross-cultural translation can be found in the emerging forms of collecting, programming, and marketing diversity?”

 


Tuesday, Feb. 3
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

The Civil War: An American Legacy, with David Goldfield

David Goldfield is the Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History, University of North Carolina, Charlotte and author of the acclaimed book America Aflame (2011). He argues that although the War ended slavery and saved the Union, it did not resolve the status of the freed slaves or the nature of the new Union. “How Americans remembered that war would shape the responses to those issues over the next 150 years.” Part of the Institute’s month-long series: Civil War, Civil Rights, and Beyond: The Resonance of the Past in the Present, supported with a grant from the Florida Humanities Council.

 


Tuesday, Feb. 10
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Stories of the South: Race and the Reconstruction of Southern Identity, 1865-1915, with K. Stephen Prince

Stephen Prince, History, USF, argues that during Reconstruction, the North assumed significant power to redefine the South, while the white South resisted, with white southern storytellers working to recast the South's image, romanticizing the Lost Cause and heralding the birth of a New South. Prince shows the centrality of popular culture to the reconstruction of southern identity. Part of the Institute’s month-long series: Civil War, Civil Rights, and Beyond: The Resonance of the Past in the Present, supported with a grant from the Florida Humanities Council.

 


Tuesday, Feb. 17
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

To Demand these God-Given Rights is to Seek Black Power: Power Politics and Civil Rights Activism, with Leslie Brown

Leslie Brown, Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies at Williams College, notes that the themes of black power and black nationalism are often associated with the radical shift of political trends during the mid- and late-1960s. But those concepts, their associated strategies of activism, and even their language can be found in the 19th Century. These concepts have not waned in the 21st century, as black people continue to demand access to their "God-given rights." Part of the Institute’s month-long series: Civil War, Civil Rights, and Beyond: The Resonance of the Past in the Present, supported with a grant from the Florida Humanities Council.

 


Tuesday, Feb. 24
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

The War That Would Not End, with Leonard Pitts, Jr.

Leonard Pitts, Jr. is a novelist, commentator, syndicated columnist, and Pulitzer Prize winner. His writing spans historical novels set in the post-Civil War era to hard-hitting current-event columns. He argues that from the moment the war ended, much of the country has sought to attain the wartime goals of the South—the suppression African-American people, men in particular—by other means. The nation's failure to live up to the principles enshrined in its founding documents and vindicated at a great cost of blood during the Civil War, was what made the Civil Rights Movement necessary. “And Ferguson is a direct reflection of how much remains yet undone.” Part of the Institute’s month-long series: Civil War, Civil Rights, and Beyond: The Resonance of the Past in the Present, supported with a grant from the Florida Humanities Council.

 


Wednesday, Mar. 11
Grace Allen Room (Library, 4th Floor)
3:00pm refreshments, 3:30pm lecture

Homegrown Humanities: Field of Fantasies: Baseball Stories of the Strange and Supernatural, with Rick Wilber

Wilber brings together a unique anthology of short stories about America’s national pastime and the supernatural. Encounter ghostly apparitions in the stands, a strangely charming vampire double-play combination, one fan who can call every shot and another who can see the past, a sad alternate-reality for the game's most famous player, unlikely appearances on the field by famous personalities. Whether you love the game or just great fiction, these stories will appeal to all.

 


Monday, Mar. 16
CWY 107
6:00pm, reception to follow

Gender Bending Science Fiction, with Ellen Klages

Klages is the author of over 20 short stories and novellas, several collections and two novels, and she serves on the “Motherboard” for the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, an annual literary prize for works of science fiction or fantasy that expand or explore issues of gender. Her first novel, The Green Glass Sea, about two misfit eleven-year-old girls living in Los Alamos during WWII, explores themes of gender, science, and history, described in a review as “an intense but accessible page-turner.” She will give a reading and discuss her work on March 16.

 


Tuesday, Mar. 17
MSC 3705
2:00pm

Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Gender Panel Discussion, with Ellen Klages, Diane Price-Herndl, and Nancy White

Rick Wilber (Mass Communications) will moderate a panel discussion on science fiction, fantasy and gender with Ellen Klages and two USF faculty members: Diane Price-Herndl (Women’s and Gender Studies) and Nancy White (Anthropology).

 


Monday, Mar. 30
MSC 4200 (The Chamber)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading, with Naomi Shihab Nye

The second Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence of Spring 2015 is Naomi Shihab Nye. Born to a Palestinian father and American mother, she has published more than 30 volumes, including poetry, essays, and novels for both adults and children. Her fellowships include Lannan, Guggenheim, and Witter Bynner (Library of Congress), and she has received numerous poetry awards, including the Lavan Award from the Academy of American Poets, the Isabella Gardner Poetry Award, the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, the Paterson Poetry Prize, four Pushcart Prizes, and the Robert Creeley Prize. Part of National Poetry Month 2015.

 


Wednesday, Apr. 1
MSC 4200 (The Chamber)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Panel Discussion, with Naomi Shihab Nye, Tahani Salah, and Amir Rabiyah, moderated by Andrea Assaf

Since 9/11, Nye has spoken often on behalf of Arab-Americans, and as a voice for cross-cultural understanding. Her volume, 19 Varieties of Gazelle: Poems of the Middle East, was widely praised for its timely message. Critic Donna Seaman wrote that “Nye’s clarion condemnation of prejudice and injustice reminds readers that most Americans have ties to other lands and that all concerns truly are universal.” On April 1 she will be joined by several other Arab American poets who will be visiting USF as part of the College of the Arts’ “Building Bridges” grant. Part of National Poetry Month 2015.

 


Monday, Apr. 6
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Shakespeare, Tragedy, and Possessing Language, with Sarah Beckwith

We continue our annual Shakespeare series with a visit from renowned Duke University scholar Sarah Beckwith, who maintains that through Shakespeare, we can better understand the importance of being human. In her talk, Beckwith argues that “The rejection of all talk of the human has left the humanities pathetically enfeebled and almost defenseless against the combined but formidable onslaughts of the corporate university, the business model of education, and its own consequential abandonment of the common reader.” She shows how Shakespeare offers us a way of talking about the human – not as either a metaphysical or biological entity to be scientifically established, nor as a definition that excludes non-rational creatures, but as a form of life to which we are fated.

 


Thursday, Apr. 16
TECO Room (College of Education)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading, with Jacqueline Osherow

Osherow is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Utah and has published several collections of poetry, her latest titled Ultimatum from Paradise. She has been awarded the Witter Bynner Prize by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, several prizes from the Poetry Society of America, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Ingram Merrill Foundation. Part of National Poetry Month 2015.

 


Tuesday, Apr. 21
TECO Room (College of Education)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading, with Meg Day and Sandra Beasley

Meg Day and Sandra Beasley will be at USF for two days to discuss the unique challenges and opportunities for female poets. Meg Day, selected for Best New Poets of 2013, is a 2013 recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry and the author of Last Psalm at Sea Level (winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize), When All You Have Is a Hammer (winner of the 2012 Gertrude Press Chapbook Contest) and We Can t Read This (winner of the 2013 Gazing Grain Chapbook Contest). A 2012 AWP Intro Journals Award Winner, she has also received awards and fellowships from the Lambda Literary Foundation, Hedgebrook, Squaw Valley Writers, the Taft-Nicholson Center for Environmental Humanities, and the International Queer Arts Festival.

Sandra Beasley is the author of I Was the Jukebox, winner of the 2009 Barnard Women Poets Prize, selected by Joy Harjo and published by W. W. Norton. Her debut, Theories of Falling, was selected by Marie Howe as winner of the 2007 New Issues Poetry Prize. In 2011, Crown published her memoir Don’t Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales from an Allergic Life, a cultural history of food allergies. She won the 2013 Center for Book Arts Chapbook competition, judged by Harryette Mullen, for “None in the Same Room: Poems from The Traveler’s Vade Mecum.” Her third full-length collection, Count the Waves, is forthcoming from W. W. Norton & Co in 2015.

 

 


Wednesday, Apr. 22
TECO Room (College of Education)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Women in Poetry Discussion Panel, with Sandra Beasley, Meg Day, and Erica Dawson

Erica Dawson (University of Tampa) will join Sandra Beasley and Meg Day to discuss issues of poetic influence, mentoring, and gender disparities in publishing. Part of National Poetry Month 2015.

 


Guests requiring disability accommodations for any event, please call 813-974-3657.