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Spring 2016Schedule

All Humanities Institute events are free and open to the public and refreshments are always served!


Parking on USF Tampa Campus

Parking can be difficult on campus. Here are a few tips to make coming to events easier! Please refer to the following links for more information.

Parking and Transportation Permits

All venues are convenient to visitor parking areas with automated Pay-by-Space machines. Download the Visitor Parking Map to identify the buildings and associated parking lots listed below.

  • Grace Allen Room (Library) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 29B and the Collins Blvd. Parking Garage
  • C.W. Bill Young Hall (CWY) - Pay-by-Space in Lot 21 or Lot 6
  • Marshall Student Center (MSC) - Pay-by-Space in Lots 3B, 3C, and the Crescent Hill Parking Garage


Wednesday, Jan. 20
Grace Allen Room (Library, 4th Floor)
3:00pm refreshments, 3:30pm lecture

Community Participatory Involvement: A Sustainable Model for Global Public Health, with Linda Whiteford (USF Anthropology)

The book describes and analyzes what made a particular global health model successful in combating a highly contagious, and often fatal, disease. Using case material drawn from the global cholera pandemic of the early 1990s, the book demonstrates how integration of ethnography, epidemiology, and non-formal education techniques embedded in a framework of structural violence proved to be an effective and sustainable model for the control of infectious disease in resource scarce settings.


Wednesday, Jan. 27
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Frenemies: The Curious Relationship between the Sciences and the Humanities, with Rebecca Newberger Goldstein

In an era that values STEM over other fields of inquiry, we’re delighted to welcome a renowned scholar who shows the importance of connecting sciences and humanities in “Frenemies: The Curious Relationship between the Sciences and the Humanities.”

Novelist and philosopher of science Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, a MacArthur “genius” recipient, was awarded the 2014 National Humanities Medal, in recognition of her success in “bringing philosophy into conversation with culture.”


Monday, Feb. 1
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Emergent Environments: Medicine and the Design of Cities with Corinna Wagner, University of Exeter

Wagner explores the relationship between medicine, architecture and urban design in the nineteenth century. In this era, medical experts, thinkers, artists, and architects shared a reform agenda. They responded to social ills and the threats posed by a globalizing world—in which goods, people, ideas and diseases circulated—by turning unhealthy, insalubrious old neighbourhoods into rationalized, hygienic, progressive spaces. Nineteenth-century writers, such as Émile Zola and Victor Hugo, and photographers such as Charles Marville in Paris, Thomas Annan in Glasgow, and John Thompson in Beijing, documented the destruction of ancient buildings and alleyways, and the birth of modern cities. By looking at some key case studies, our exploration will shed light on the complex (and unsettling) ways we deal with perceived threats to our bodily, social and economic security.

 


Wednesday, Feb. 17
Grace Allen Room (Library, 4th Floor)
3:00pm refreshments, 3:30pm lecture

Homegrown Humanities: Race and the Politics of Knowledge Production: Diaspora and Black Transnational Scholarship in the United States and Brazil, with Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman (USF SOC/ISLAC)

In this co-edited volume, Gladys L. Mitchell-Walthour and Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman have invited contributors of African descent from the United States and Brazil to reflect on their multidimensional experiences in the field as researchers, collaborators, and allies to communities of color. Contributors promote an interdisciplinary perspective, as they represent the fields of sociology, political science, anthropology, and the humanities. They engage W.E.B. Du Bois' notion of 'second-sight,' which suggests that the unique positionality of Black researchers might provide them with advantages in their empirical observations and knowledge production. They expose the complex and contradictory efforts, discourses, and performances that Black researchers must use to implement and develop their community-centered research agenda. They illustrate that 'second-sight' is not inevitable but must be worked at and is sometimes not achieved in certain research and cultural contexts.

 


Wednesday, Feb. 24
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Public Renaissance: The Italian piazza as a social media space, with Fabrizio Nevola, University of Exeter

Symmetrical and harmonious, the piazza was an innovative urban design typology developed during the Renaissance in Italy. Setting aside its idealized depiction in treatises and sparsely populated paintings, I will instead discuss its everyday use and representation and ask whether we might consider the piazza a pre-modern social media space. In the latter part of the talk I will also ask how locative media practices and wider digital humanities approaches can be implicated in formulating new historical research questions by introducing my recently-published cultural history smartphone tour app, Hidden Florence.

 


Wednesday, Mar. 9
CWY 109
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading by Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence, Terrance Hayes

Terrance Hayes, a MacArthur “genius” fellow and professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh, has become one of the country’s most celebrated poets, addressing themes of popular culture, race, music, and masculinity. His poetry collections include Lighthead (2010), which won the National Book Award, and was also a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award. Earlier collections were Wind in a Box (2006); Hip Logic (2002), a finalist for an LA Times Book Award and an Academy of American Poets James Laughlin Award; and Muscular Music (1999), which won a Kate Tufts Discovery Award. His most recent collection (2015) is How to Be Drawn, and a finalist for the National Book Award.

 


Monday, Mar. 21
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

An Evening with James Morrow

James Morrow is the award-winning author of over ten novels, as well as novellas and short-story collections. His critically acclaimed works include Blameless in Abaddon, New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and The Last Witchfinder called "provocative book-club bait" and "an inventive feat" by critic Janet Maslin. He has twice received the World Fantasy Award, for Only Begotten Daughter and Towing Jehovah, and has also won the Nebula Award and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. He lives in State College, Pennsylvania, with his wife and their two enigmatic dogs.

 


Tuesday, Mar. 22
Grace Allen Room (Library, 4th Floor)
2:00pm

Science Fiction and Fantasy Discussion Panel

Topic and panelists TBD

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, Apr. 6
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Bard Sell: Shakespeare's Adventures in Advertising , Douglas Lanier, University of New Hampshire

Advertising, it has been said, is the poetry of consumer capitalism. If that's the case, one of capitalist poetry's favorite and most enduring touchstones has been the works and person of William Shakespeare. "Bard Sell" will offer a short, entertaining history of Shakespeare's many cameo appearances in advertising from the nineteenth century to the present. Those appearances, Professor Lanier will argue, provide us with a composite portrait of changing attitudes toward Shakespeare in popular culture and raise interesting questions about Shakespeare's future prospects in an ever-more crowded mediasphere.

 


Tuesday, Apr. 12
TECO Room (College of Education)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading by Maurice Manning

Manning’s first book of poetry, Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions, was selected by W.S. Merwin for the 2001 Yale Series of Younger Poets. He has gone on to publish four additional books including A Companion for Owls: Being the Commonplace Book of D. Boone, Lone Hunter, Back Woodsman, &c. (2004), Bucolics (2007), The Common Man (2010), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in poetry, and The Gone and the Going Away (2013). Manning is faculty in the MFA program at Warren Wilson College and the Sewanee Writing Conference and is a professor of English at Transylvania University.


Thursday, Apr. 21
TECO Room (College of Education)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading by Tina Chang

Tina Chang was raised in New York City. She is the first female to be named Poet Laureate of Brooklyn and is the author of the collections of poetry Of Gods & Strangers (2011) and Half-Lit Houses (2004). She is also the co-editor of the W.W. Norton anthology Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond (2008). She is the recipient of awards from the New York Foundation for the Arts, Academy of American Poets, Poets & Writers, the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation, and the Van Lier Foundation among others. She teaches poetry at Sarah Lawrence College and she is also a member of the international writing faculty at the City University of Hong Kong.


Tuesday, Apr. 26
CWY 206
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry of Jihad with Zacharias Pieri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Guests requiring disability accommodations for any event, please call 813-974-3657.