banner USF College of Arts & Sciences A-Z Index CAS USF Search OASIS myUSF

USF Home > College of Arts and Sciences > Humanities Institute

Spring 2014 Schedule

All Humanities Institute events are free and open to the public!


Parking on USF Tampa Campus

Parking can be difficult on campus. Here are a few tips to make coming to events easier! Please refer to the following links for more information.

Parking and Transportation Permits

Visitor Parking Map

If the event you are attending is at:

  • Patel Center for Global Solutions(CGS) - Meter parking in Lot 23B
  • Grace Allen Room (Library) - Meter parking in Lot 29B
  • C.W. Bill Young Hall (CWY) - Meter parking in Lot 21 or Lot 6


Tuesday, Mar. 4
TECO Room (Education Building)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Medieval Castles, Lordship and the Making of the English Landscape, with Oliver Creighton

Oliver Creighton, a visiting scholar from the University of Exeter, will speak on “Medieval Castles, Lordship and the Making of the English Landscape.” He writes: “Castles were among the most dominant features of the English medieval landscape and many remain impressive today. I will present an overview of the impacts of fortification on town and country and highlight the role of lordship in re-shaping the medieval world, presenting a case study of power and authority in the landscape.”

 

 


Wednesday, Mar. 5
Grace Allen Room (Library 4th floor)
Refreshments at 3:00pm, Talk at 3:30pm

Homegrown Humanities: Frances L. Ramos (History), Identity, Ritual, and Power in Colonial Puebla

Located between Mexico City and Veracruz, Puebla has been a political hub since its founding as Puebla de los Ángeles in 1531. Frances L. Ramos’s dynamic and meticulously researched study exposes and explains the many (and often surprising) ways that politics and political culture were forged, tested, and demonstrated through public ceremonies in eighteenth-century Puebla, colonial Mexico’s “second city.”

Ramos portrays elaborate rituals such as the royal oath ceremonies, funerary rites, feast-day celebrations, viceregal entrance ceremonies, and Holy Week processions while decoding the intense debates over their expenditures, finding them to be a central part of ongoing efforts of councilmen to negotiate political relationships. Even with the Spanish Crown’s increasing disapproval of costly public ritual and a worsening economy, Puebla’s councilmen consistently defied all attempts to diminish their importance.


Thursday, Mar. 6
Grace Allen Room (Library 4th floor)
Refreshments at 3:00pm, Talk at 3:30pm

Landscape and Memory in Early Modern England, with Nicola Whyte

Nicola Whyte, a visiting scholar from the University of Exeter, will speak on “Landscape and Memory in Early Modern England,” examining “everyday experiences of landscape, drawing on a rich corpus of archival material dating to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with particular reference to the memories, customs, and knowledge practices of non-elites, who are often overlooked. I conclude by considering some of the broader implications of revealing alternative narratives of landscape and place, for our modern times.”

 


March 31 - April 4: Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence, Li-Young Lee


As a highlight of National Poetry Month, we welcome distinguished poet and memoirist Li-Young Lee, who will visit March 31- April 4.

Lee was born in Jakarta, Indonesia, to Chinese parents. In 1959, the Lee family fled Indonesia to escape the anti-Chinese sentiment that later exploded in the 1965 genocides; his family settled in the United States in 1964. Lee’s poetry explores the joys and sorrows of family, home, loss, exile, and love; he is author of four critically acclaimed books of poetry, including Behind My Eyes; Book of My Nights; Rose (winner of the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award); The City in Which I Love You (the 1990 Lamont Poetry Selection); and a memoir, The Winged Seed: A Remembrance, which received an American Book Award. His many other honors include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Lannan Foundation, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

According to a recent review of his work, “Lee is not only one of our best contemporary poets of the sacred, he is an authentic mystic … Confounding dichotomy, Lee calls into question the division between beginning/end, birth/death, past/future, man/woman, body/mind. Borders melt; language opens. These poems approach the very edge of the ineffable, that which cannot be articulated.”

Hear Lee read and talk about his poem, “This Room & Everything in It.”

Continuing our tradition started last year, Lee will present awards in the HI Poetry Competition, visit several classes, and will read and speak on April 1 and April 3.

Tuesday, Apr. 1
Patel Center Auditorium
6:00pm, reception to follow

Poetry Reading

Thursday, Apr. 3
Patel Center Auditorium
6:00pm, reception to follow

Interview and Audience

 


April: National Poetry Month


NPM@USF2014 has an impressive lineup of events, beginning with a week-long visit from renowned poet, Li-Young Lee. Please visit the NPM@USF website for author bios, descriptions, and other detailed information for April's events:

  • Apr. 1: Li-Young Lee Poetry Reading. Patel Center Auditorium, 6:00pm, reception to follow.
  • Apr. 3: Li-Young Lee, Interview and Audience Q&A. Patel Center Auditorium, 6:00pm, reception to follow.
  • Apr. 7: Micheal O'Siadhail Poetry Reading. TECO Room (College of Education), 6:00pm, reception to follow.
  • Apr. 9: Homegrown Humanities with Ira Sukrungruang (English). Grace Allen Room (Library), 3:00pm refreshments, 3:30pm talk.
  • Apr. 15: The Making of Shakespeares: Commemoration, Cultural Memory, and "the Bard" with Coppélia Kahn. CWY 206 (Military Sciences Building), 6:00pm, reception to follow.
  • Apr. 16: Alexis Orgera and John Nieves Poetry Reading. TECO Room (College of Education), 6:00pm.
  • Apr. 25: Jay Hopler and Kimberly Johnson Poetry Reading. TECO Room (College of Education), 6:00pm.

 


Monday, Apr. 21
CWY 109 (Military Sciences Building)
6:00pm, reception to follow

Paradigm Lost: A Late Glacial Colonization of the Americas with Bruce Bradley

Bruce Bradley, a visiting scholar from the University of Exeter, will talk on “Paradigm Lost: A Late Glacial Colonization of the Americas.” He presents “evidence that even before ancient Siberians, the Americas were explored by Ice Age Palaeolithic people from southwestern Europe. The evidence is archaeological, ecological, oceanographic, ethnological and genetic. The idea has been considered heretical in the scientific community, but this work challenges the deeply-held beliefs of academics and the public to visualize a new paradigm of how human beings came to settle the last empty land masses on the planet.”