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2013 National Poetry Month Guest Speakers

Special thanks to the following poets who came to USF April, 2013


Jorie Graham

Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence
April 1 - 6, 2013

Poetry Reading
April 2, 6:00pm
Patel Center for Global Solutions Auditorium

"Sea Change: Poetry & The Environment" Lecture
April 4, 6:00pm
Marshall Student Center, room 2708

Pulitzer Prize-winning Poet, Jorie Graham, will be the second Humanities Institute Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence as part of National Poetry Month. Jorie Graham is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including the Forward Prize-winning and T.S. Eliot Prize-nominated PLACE (Ecco, 2012), Sea Change (2008), Overlord (HarperCollins, 2005); Never (HarperCollins, 2002); Swarm (2000); The Errancy (1997); The Dream of the Unified Field: Selected Poems 1974-1994, which won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; Materialism (1993); Region of Unlikeness (1991); The End of Beauty (1987); Erosion (1983); and Hybrids of Plants and of Ghosts (1980). She has also edited two anthologies, Earth Took of Earth: 100 Great Poems of the English Language (1996) and The Best American Poetry 1990.

Graham's many honors include a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from The American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. She has taught at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and is currently the Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard University. She served as a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets from 1997 to 2003. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts and in the Litchfield Hills of Connecticut.




Katherine Riegel
April 10, 4:00pm
Grace Allen Room (4th floor of the USF Library).

Katherine Riegel is the author of Castaway and What the Mouth Was Made For. Riegel’s work has appeared in Crazyhorse, the Gettysburg Review, Brevity, Fourth Genre, and others. She received her M.F.A. from the University of Iowa and teaches poetry at USF. She currently serves as the poetry editor for Sweet: A Literary Confection. Riegel is April’s Homegrown Humanities scholar and will read from her new book, What the Mouth Was Made For.




Jennifer Key
April 11, 6:00pm
USF Graphicstudio (behind the Embassy Suites on Spectrum Blvd)

Jennifer Key, of Pinehurst, North Carolina, won the 2012 Tampa Review Prize for Poetry for her manuscript, The Old Dominion. Key teaches creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke and serves as the editor for Pembroke Magazine. Her work has appeared in The Antioch Review, The Carolina Quarterly, Callaloo, and elsewhere.

Co-sponsored by the Florida Literary Arts Council and the USF Dept. of English.




John Lysaker
April 12, 2:00pm
Grace Allen Room (4th floor of the USF Library).

John Lysaker is Professor of Philosophy at Emory University and will be giving a lecture entitled, “Renewing the Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry: A Philosophy for Art.” In his talk, Dr. Lysaker will focus on visual artists, Anselm Kiefer and Barbara Kruger, and poets, Joseph Brodsky and A.R. Ammons.

Part of the Dept. of Philosophy’s Colloquium Series.




Staged Reading of Jorge Zalamea’s
The Dream from the Steps.

April 15, 6:00pm
Marshall Student Center, room 3707

This event is organizaed and hosted by USF graduate student, Gloria Muñoz. USF faculty and students will be reading Muñoz’s translation of Jorge Zalamea’s epic poem, El Sueño de las Escalinatas (The Dream from the Steps). Zalamea (1905-1969) is considered one of the most controversial and influential Latin American writers of his time. He wrote plays, essays and poems about fundamental global social issues that were present in Latin America after the Spanish Civil War. On a broader spectrum, Zalamea wrote about the global social injustices that were, and still continue to be, relevant. Zalamea’s, El Sueño de las Escalinatas (released in 1964) is an essay poem hybrid that depicts the many ignored inequalities experienced by people around the world. The event will include a reading, live music and an interactive discussion on translation.

Gloria Muñoz is a poet, translator and editor who is completing her MFA at USF. She has been honored by the Estelle J. Zbar Poetry Prize, the Bettye Newman Poetry Award, the New York Summer Writer's Institute Fellowship, and the Think Small to Think Big Artist Grant. Her work has appeared in Dark Phrases, The Brooklyn Review, The Sarah Lawrence Review, The Sadie Lou Standard, The Clever Title Book Review and in Sweet Lit.




Carolyn Hembree.
April 17, 6:00pm
USF Graphicstudio (behind the Embassy Suites on Spectrum Blvd)

Hembree will be reading from her recently published collection, Skinny. Her poems have appeared in the Colorado Review, DIAGRAM, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, jubilat, and Witness, among other journals and anthologies. Her poetry has received three Pushcart Prize nominations, a PEN Writers Grant, a Southern Arts Federation Grant, and a Louisiana Division of the Arts Fellowship Award in Literature. She currently teaches at the University of New Orleans.




Ira Sukrungruang.
April 19, 6:00pm
Marshall Student Center, room 2707

Ira Sukrungruang won the 2012 Tampa Press Anita Claire Schraf Award for his poetry collection, In Thailand It is Night. He is the author of Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy and has published his essays, poems, and short stories in many literary journals and anthologies, including Creative Nonfiction, the Bellingham Review, North American Review, Isotope, Crab Orchard Review, Post Road, and Tilting the Continent: Southeast Asian American Writing. He has received the New York Foundation for the Arts Nonfiction Fellowship, The Just Desserts Fiction Prize, and an Illinois Arts Council Literary Award, and received support from the Blue Mountain Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Writers Colony at Dairy Hollow.




Poetry & The Visual Arts
Featuring Terri Witek and Cyriaco Lopes

April 22, 6:30pm
Marshall Student Center, room 4200

Terri Witek is the author of five books including, Exit Island, The Shipwreck Dress, and The Carnal World. She teaches English at Stetson University, where she holds the Sullivan Chair in Creative Writing. Throughout her career she has worked with visual artists, and the reverberations between mediums is explored in much of her work. Her collaborations with Brazilian new media artist Cyriaco Lopes have been featured in galleries or site-specific projects in New York City, Los Angeles and elsewhere.

Cyriaco Lopes. In the U.S., Cyriaco Lopes’ work has been seen at The Contemporary Art Museums in Baltimore and Saint Louis, at El Museo and at Apexart in NYC. In his native Brazil his work appeared at the National Museum of Fine Arts, The Museums of Modern Art in Rio and Salvador and the São Paulo Art Museum (MASP). His work appeared in art institutions in France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Chile, Portugal, and since 2009 it was seen in Guent, Nantes, Belfast, Florianópolis, Reykjavik and Genoa. His work has been curated by such artists as Lygia Pape, Janine Antoni, and Luciano Fabro, as well as by art critics such as Paulo Herkenhoff. Lopes won Stetson University Hand Award for Faculty Achievement (2007), The Contemporary Art Museum Saint Louis Project Award (2003), the World Studio Foundation Award (2001), the Phillips Prize of trip to Europe (1997). He is a professor at John Jay College/CUNY in NYC.




Stephen Kampa.
April 24, 6:00pm
USF Graphicstudio
(behind the Embassy Suites on Spectrum Blvd)

Stephen Kampa holds degrees from Carleton College and the Johns Hopkins University. His work has appeared in the Hopkins Review, Southwest Review, River Styx, Subtropics, and Smartish Pace. He currently lives in Daytona Beach, Florida, where he works as a musician. His first book, Cracks in the Invisible, won the 2012 Florida Book Award Gold Medal.



Pulitzer Prize-winner Jorie Graham read from her critically-acclaimed work “PLACE”

as part of her week-long visit to USF.

 

 

By Barbara Melendez

USF News

 

TAMPA, Fla. (April 3, 2013) – Poetry fans were poised for a rare treat Tuesday evening. Jorie Graham, one of America’s premiere poets would read from her latest work and autograph their books.


To a hushed and appreciative audience she delivered selections from her critically-acclaimed “PLACE (2012),” accentuating her words and phrases with graceful yet emphatic hand gestures – the urgency in her voice conveying the gentle command to pay attention to the details in her stream of imagery. She transported her listeners into as many emotions and time periods as geographic places and left them deeply moved. 


She once told the Paris Review, ““A poem is a private story, after all, no matter how apparently public. The reader is always overhearing a confession.” With each of her poems, she set the context for its creation, letting listeners in on the deeper levels of her private stories that were inspired by the important people and places in her life.


The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet is the USF Humanities Institute‘s second distinguished scholar-in-residence and will devote the rest of her week to spending time in English honors and graduate classes and conducting graduate workshops. She will present a lecture on Thursday at 6 p.m., “Why Poetry Matters.,” an event that is free and open to the public at the Marshall Student Center Room 2708.


As Elizabeth Bird, Humanities Institute director pointed out, Graham’s reading of her work showed quite well why poetry matters best of all, but encouraged the audience to hear what more she has to say.


“When she introduced her beautiful and complex poems with stories about how the poems came to be written, the audience was spell-bound as I’m sure they will be on Thursday,” she said. “Her visit, and the whole Scholar-in-Residence program, is important because it offers the opportunity for our students, faculty, and staff to interact directly with inspiring humanities scholars and artists. They may have read their work before, but the personal insight and engagement are priceless. In addition, the program helps put USF on the map as a university where the humanities are valued and supported, as they are at all truly great institutions.”


Graham set the tone for National Poetry Month’s celebration at USF – a profound appreciation for words and imagination – as soon as she arrived in Tampa. She visited a Modern and Contemporary Anglo-American Poetry class taught by English Department Chair Hunt Hawkins a few hours before her reading.


She was gracious enough to start the program by presenting awards to the winners of the Humanities Institute first ever poetry contest. High school students and USF students, faculty, and staff submitted over 100 poems on this year's theme: "Florida 2013." The top three poets in both the High School and USF categories received special awards (winners listed below).


The 15 high school poets and five USF poets selected as finalists are being featured throughout the month of April on the institute’s NPM@USF website. An additional 12 high school students and two additional USF poets received honorable mentions and will be featured on the website as well.


Graham’s global background blends well with USF’s emphasis on preparing students for global leadership. Born in New York City, raised in Rome and educated in French schools, she studied at the Sorbonne before attending New York University and then the University of Iowa for her undergraduate and master’s degrees.


Her book “The Dream of the Unified Field: Selected Poems 1974-1994” won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In addition to her critically-acclaimed works, notably "Sea Change" (2008), "Never" (2002) and "Swarm" (2000), Graham has also edited two anthologies, "Earth Took of Earth: 100 Great Poems of the English Language" (1996) and "The Best American Poetry 1990."


Described by the U.S. Poetry Foundation as “perhaps the most celebrated poet of the American post-war generation,” Graham is the Boylston Professor of Poetry at Harvard. She was the first woman to be awarded this position, following in the footsteps of the renowned Irish poet Seamus Heaney and all the way back to John Quincy Adams. Seamus Heaney and a chair whose occupants date back to John Quincy Adams. She was the first woman to be awarded this position. Seamus Heaney and a chair whose occupants date back to John Quincy Adams. She was the first woman to be awarded this position.


Her many honors include a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from The American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. She was the first American woman to receive the prestigious British 2012 Forward Prize for “Places (2012).”


A position previously held by Seamus Heaney and a chair whose occupants date back to John Quincy Adams. She was the first woman to be awarded this position. a position previously held by Seamus Heaney and a chair whose occupants date back to John Quincy Adams. She was the first woman to be awarded this position. She has also taught at the prestigious University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and served as a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets from 1997 to 2003.